Coventry race format explained.

The White & Yellow top race at Coventry has become something of a favourite with race fans, so when the race format reverted to the traditional three heat format for the September meeting, we asked Coventry’s Sophie Clark to explain the decision.

We changed the traditional 3 heat format to create a Whites & Yellows race to encourage lower graders and new drivers into the sport by creating one race that was a level playing field which also created a greater opportunity for the prize money to be shared out to the lower grades. We needed to get new drivers, or those that were taking time out from racing, back due to a drop off in available drivers which gave us a choice to reduce to five races or to effectively run five races with an extra W&Y race.

It was, and has been, a great success with frequently forty W&Y grade drivers now booking in, compared to the pre-change, when we got in the twenties. However, it has created more problems than it has solved. It has become one of the best races of the night with a lot of contact which has helped to grow drivers confidence in giving and receiving hits, however that has to be balanced by the huge increase in damage.

We also found a few W&Y drivers refusing to take part in heat 1 due to the costs of repairs, and they preferred to wait for heat 2 or 3. The drop-off in car numbers due to damage was making heats 2 and 3 appear to be boring as there is not enough cars on track, so the racing became roundy-roundy. But when a driver was hit it tended to be at higher speeds, thus causing more damage which led to low car numbers in the consolation.

So by changing it back to three heats it was hoped that spreading the lower graders across three heats would lead to lower damage, higher car numbers in the first four races, more competitive racing, and a sort of levelling effect across the races.

We had no idea if it would work, or be accepted by the public and drivers, but we have been delighted by the response which has all been positive.

What it tells me is that the sport has to have flexibility in order to keep the racing good, and the courage to take the decision to make changes when you could face a backlash from drivers and fans. I am sure that one race day where it worked is not enough to base long term decisions but in the short term we will look to keep to the traditional three heat format.

Facebook Network:

What is this?

Latest Posts
King's Lynn, 23rd September 2017 - Meeting Report and Photos
King’s Lynn, 23rd September 2017 – Meeting Report and Photos
Oct 3, 2017

The old guard of Wainman and Smith dominated the third shootout round at King’s Lynn.

Northampton, 17th September 2017 - Meeting Report and Photos
Northampton, 17th September 2017 – Meeting Report and Photos
Sep 23, 2017

Fresh from his World Final win, Nigel Green took the World Masters at Northampton.

Ipswich, 16th September 2017 - Meeting Report and Photos
Ipswich, 16th September 2017 – Meeting Report and Photos
Sep 22, 2017

Full report from world final night, where Stuart Smith Junior took the win in the meeting final.

World Final 2017 - Video
World Final 2017 – Video
Sep 21, 2017

The 2017 World Championship race

World Final 2017 - Race Report
World Final 2017 – Race Report
Sep 18, 2017

Nigel Green becomes the 2017 World Champion

Stockin’ all over the World: Overseas Drivers Preview
Stockin’ all over the World: Overseas Drivers Preview
Sep 14, 2017

A look at the International drivers competing in the 2017 World Final weekend

Book Review: FWJ
Book Review: FWJ
Sep 12, 2017

Review of the new book written by none other than Frankie Wainman Junior, in which he reveals all about his life behind the wheel.

Preview: World Final 2017
Preview: World Final 2017
Sep 10, 2017

Before next weekend’s World Championship, Scott Reeves takes a look at the drivers to watch out for.


Track Photography

Recent Archives